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Oracle Real Application Clusters 11g Release 2 and Grid Infrastructure Administration

Question No: 71

Your network administrator informs you that the Internet service provider is being changed in a month#39;s time in conjunction with a data center move.

You are asked to plan for the changes required in the Oracle Grid Infrastructure, which is set up to use GNS.

The IP addresses and subnets of the public network are to change.

Which two must be done in the Oracle Grid Infrastructure network setup to accommodate this change using the command-line Interfaces available?

  1. The SCAN VIPs and node VIPs must be reconfigured using srvctl.

  2. The SCAN VIPs and SCAN listener resources must be removed and added to obtain the new SCAN IP addresses from DHCP.

  3. The interconnect must be reconfigured by using oifcfg, crsctl, and ifconfig.

  4. The SCAN VIPs and node VIPs must be reconfigured by using oifcfg.

  5. The Interconnect must be reconfigured by using srvctl.

    Answer: C,D Explanation:

    How to Modify Public or Private Network Information in Oracle Clusterware [ID

    283684.1]

    Modified 14-MAR-2012 Type HOWTO Status PUBLISHED

    Applies to:

    Oracle Server – Enterprise Edition – Version: 10.1.0.2 to 11.2.0.3 – Release: 10.1 to 11.2 Information in this document applies to any platform.

    Goal

    The purpose of this note is to describe how to change or update the cluster_interconnect and/or public interface information that is stored in OCR.

    It may be necessary to change or update interface names, or subnet associated with an interface if there is a network change affecting the servers, or if the original information that was input during the installation was incorrect. It may also be the case that for some reason, the Oracle Interface Configuration Assistant (#39;oifcfg#39;) did not succeed during the installation.

    This note is not intended as a means to change the Public or Private Hostname themselves. Public hostname or Private hostname can only be changed by removing/adding nodes, or reinstalling Oracle Clusterware.

    However, node VIP name/IP can be changed, refer to Note 276434.1 for details. Refer to note 1386709.1 for basics of IPv4 subnet and Oracle Clusterware

    Instructions for Changing Interfaces/Subnet

    1. Public Network Change

      If the change is only public IP address and the new ones are still in the same subnet, nothing needs to be done on clusterware level (all changes needs to be done on OS level to reflect the change).

      If the change involves different subnet or interface, as there is not a #39;modify#39; option – you will need to delete the interface and add it back with the correct information. So, in the example here, the subnet is being changed from 10.2.156.0 to 10.2.166.0 via two separate commands – first a #39;delif#39; followed by a #39;setif#39;:

      % $ORA_CRS_HOME/bin/oifcfg delif -global eth0

      % $ORA_CRS_HOME/bin/oifcfg setif -global eth0/10.2.166.0:public syntax: oifcfg setif

      lt;interface-namegt;/lt;subnetgt;:lt;cluster_interconnect|publicgt;

      Note: If public network is changed, it may be necessary to change VIP as well, refer to Note 276434.1 for details; for 11gR2, it may be necessary to change SCAN as well, refer to note 972500.1 for details (This procedure does not apply when GNS is being used).

    2. Private Network Change

      2A. For pre-11gR2, if you wish to change the cluster_interconnect information and/or private IP address, hosts file needs to be modified on each node to reflect the change while the Oracle Clusterware Stack is down on all nodes. After the stack has restarted, to change the cluster_interconnect used by RDBMS and ASM instances, run oifcfg. In this example:

      % $ORA_CRS_HOME/bin/oifcfg delif -global eth1

      % $ORA_CRS_HOME/bin/oifcfg setif -global eth1/192.168.1.0:cluster_interconnect 2B. For 11gR2 and higher, refer to note 1073502.1

      Note: For 11gR2, as clusterware also uses cluster_interconnect, intended private network must be added by quot;oifcfg setifquot; before stopping clusterware for any change.

      Note: If you are running OCFS2 on Linux and are changing the private IP address for your cluster, you may also need to change the private IP address that OCFS2 is using to communicate with other nodes. For more information on this, please refer to lt;Note 604958.1gt;

    3. Verify the correct interface subnet is in use by re-running oifcfg with the #39;getif#39; option:

% $ORA_CRS_HOME/bin/oifcfg getif eth0 10.2.166.0 global public

eth1 192.168.1.0 global cluster_interconnect

How to Modify Private Network Interface in 11.2 Grid Infrastructure [ID 1073502.1] Modified 08-FEB-2012 Type HOWTO Status PUBLISHED

Applies to:

Oracle Server – Enterprise Edition – Version: 11.2.0.1.0 and later [Release: 11.2 and later ] Information in this document applies to any platform.

Goal

The purpose of this document is to demonstrate how to change the private network interface configuration stored in the OCR. This may be required if the name of the interface for the private network (cluster interconnect) needs to be changed at the OS level, for example, the private network is configured on a single network interface eth0, now you want to replace it with a bond interface bond0 and eth0 will be part of the bond0 interface. It also includes command for adding/deleting a private network interface.

Solution

As of 11.2 Grid Infrastructure, the CRS daemon (crsd.bin) now has a dependency on the private network configuration stored in the gpnp profile and OCR. If the private network is not available or its definition is incorrect, the CRSD process will not start and any subsequent changes to the OCR will be impossible.

Therefore care needs to be taken when making modifications to the configuration of the

private network. It is important to perform the changes in the correct order.

Note: If only private network IP is going to be changed, the subnet and network interface remain same (for examples changing private IP from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.10), simply shutdown GI stack, make IP modification at OS level (like /etc/hosts, network config etc) for private network, then restart GI stack will complete the task.

The following procedures apply when subnet or network interface name also requires change.

Please take a backup of profile.xml on all cluster nodes before proceeding, as grid user:

$ cd $GRID_HOME/gpnp/lt;hostnamegt;/profiles/peer/

$ cp -p profile.xml profile.xml.bk

To modify the private network (cluster_interconnect):

  1. Ensure CRS is running on ALL cluster nodes in the cluster

  2. As grid user, add new interface:

    Find the interface which needs to be removed. For example:

    $ oifcfg getif

    eth1 100.17.10.0 global public

    eth0 192.168.0.0 global cluster_interconnect

    Here the eth0 interface will be replaced by bond0 interface. Add new interface bond0:

    $ oifcfg setif -global lt;interfacegt;/lt;subnetgt;:cluster_interconnect

    For example:

    $ oifcfg setif -global bond0/192.168.0.0:cluster_interconnect

    This can be done with -global option even if the interface is not available yet, but this can not be done with – node option if the interface is not available, it will lead to node eviction.

    If the interface is available on the server, subnet address can be identified by command:

    $ oifcfg iflist

    It lists the network interface and its subnet address. This command can be run even if CRS is not up and running. Please note, subnet address might not be in the format of x.y.z.0.

    For example, it can be:

    $ oifcfg iflist lan1 18.1.2.0

    lan2 10.2.3.64 lt;lt; this is the private network subnet address associated with privet network IP: 10.2.3.86

    If the scenario is just to add a 2nd private network, for example: new interface is eth3 with

    subnet address:

    192.168.1.96, then issue:

    $ oifcfg setif -global eth3/192.168.1.96:cluster_interconnect Verify the change:

    $ oifcfg getif

  3. Shutdown CRS on all nodes and disable the CRS as root user:

    # crsctl stop crs

    # crsctl disable crs

  4. Make the network configuration change at OS level as required, ensure the new interface is available on all nodes after the change.

    $ ifconfig -a

    $ ping lt;private hostnamegt;

  5. Enable CRS and restart CRS on all nodes as root user:

    # crsctl enable crs

    # crsctl start crs

  6. Remove the old interface:

$ oifcfg delif -global eth0

Note #1. This step is not required for adding 2nd interface scenario.

#2. If the new interface is added without removing the old interface, eg: old interface still available when CRS restart, then after step 6, CRS needs to be stop and start again to ensure the old interface is no longer in use.

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Workaround: restore the OS network configuration back to the original status, start CRS. Then follow above steps to make the changes again.

Please consult with Oracle Support Service if after restoring OS network configuration, CRS still could not start.

  1. If any one node is down in the cluster, oifcfg command will fail with error:

    $ oifcfg setif -global bond0/192.168.0.0:cluster_interconnect PRIF-26: Error in update the profiles in the cluster

    Workaround: start CRS on the node where it is not running. Ensure CRS is up on all cluster nodes.

  2. If a user other than Grid Infrastructure owner issues above command, it will fail with same error: $ oifcfg setif -global bond0/192.168.0.0:cluster_interconnect

    PRIF-26: Error in update the profiles in the cluster

    Workaround: ensure to login as Grid Infrastructure owner to perform such command.

  3. From 11.2.0.2 onwards, if attempt to delete the last private interface (cluster_interconnect) without adding a new one first, following error will occur:

    PRIF-31: Failed to delete the specified network interface because it is the last private interface

    Workaround: Add new private interface first before deleting the old private interface.

  4. If CRS is down on the node, the following error is expected:

    $ oifcfg getif

    PRIF-10: failed to initialize the cluster registry Workaround: Start the CRS on the node

    My Oracle Support

    Question No: 72

    You installed the Oracle Grid Infrastructure on a four-node cluster before discussing the network requirements with the network administrator who was on holiday.

    You created a single scan named mydb-scan.myclust.example.com by adding this name to the /etc/hosts file. As a result, the Grid Infrastructure has four node listeners and node VIP but only a single SCAN listener and SCAN VIP.

    The network administrator has returned and modified the corporate DNS server to associate three IP addresses with the mydb-scan.myclust.example.com scan name. The SCAN VIPs are on the same network as the node VIPs.

    You now must replace the single SCAN VIP and listener with three of each for high

    availability purposes and make certain that the SCANs and listeners are active. Which procedure will do this properly if run as the root user?

    1. srvctl stop scan_listener srvctl stop scan

      srvctl start scan

      srvctl start scan_listener

    2. srvctl stop scan_listener srvctl stop scan

      srvctl remove scan

      srvctl add scan -n MYDB-SCAN.MYCLUST.EXAMPLE.COM srvctl start scan

      srvctl start scan_listener

    3. srvctl add scan -n MYDB-SCAN.MYCLUST.EXAMPLE.COM srvctl start scan

      srvctl start scan_listener

    4. srvctl stop scan_listener srvctl stop scan

srvctl remove scan srvctl add scan srvctl start scan

srvctl start scan listener

Answer: B Explanation:

How to update the IP address of the SCAN VIP resources (ora.scan.vip) [ID 952903.1] Modified 03-JAN-2012 Type HOWTO Status PUBLISHED

In this Document Goal

Solution

Applies to:

Oracle Server – Enterprise Edition – Version: 11.2.0.1 to 11.2.0.1 – Release: 11.2 to 11.2 Information in this document applies to any platform.

Goal

The purpose of this document is to explain how to change the IP addresses associated with the SCAN VIPs in a 11gR2 Grid (CRS) environment.

The IP addresses associated with the SCAN VIP resources are initially set when the SCAN resources are created.

Any changes to the DNS entry for the SCAN are not automatically propagated to the clusterware and need to be done manually.

This applies only to installations that are not using GNS.

The information in this note can also be helpful in cases where SCAN was originally

configured with just one address and is now being expanded to accommodate three IP addresses.

Solution

Before the SCAN VIPs can be changed, the entry for the SCAN name on the Domain Name Server (DNS) needs to be updated with the new IP addresses. This usually will be done by a network administrator. To check the current setting, the following command can be used:

nslookup lt;scan_namegt;

To check the current IP address(es) of the SCAN VIPs, run the following commands as the root user:

$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl config scan

Next refresh the SCAN VIPs with the new IP addresses from the DNS entry:

$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl modify scan -n lt;scan_namegt;

To check if the SCAN VIPs have been changed, run the following command, it should now show the new IP addresses.

$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl config scan

Below is an example using the following configuration:

The name of the SCAN is sales-scan.example.com subnet of the public network is 10.100.10.0 netmask for the public network is 255.255.255.0 name of the public interface is eth1

old IP addresses: 10.100.10.81, 10.100.10.82 amp; 10.100.10.83

new IP addresses: 10.100.10.121, 10.100.10.122 amp; 10.100.10.123

A lookup of the SCAN on the DNS server shows that the entry has already been updated with the new IP addresses:

Server: dns1.example.com Address: 10.100.10.70#53

Name: sales-scan.example.com Address: 10.100.10.123

Name: sales-scan.example.com Address: 10.100.10.122

Name: sales-scan.example.com Address: 10.100.10.121

Stop the SCAN listener and the SCAN VIP resources:

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl stop scan_listener

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl stop scan

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl status scan SCAN VIP scan1 is enabled

SCAN VIP scan1 is not running SCAN VIP scan2 is enabled SCAN VIP scan2 is not running SCAN VIP scan3 is enabled SCAN VIP scan3 is not running

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl status scan_listener SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN1 is enabled SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN1 is not running SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN2 is enabled SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN2 is not running SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN3 is enabled SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN3 is not running

The SCAN VIP resources still show the old IP addresses:

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl config scan

SCAN name: sales-scan, Network: 1/10.100.10.0/255.255.255.0/eth1 SCAN VIP name: scan1, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.81 SCAN VIP name: scan2, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.82 SCAN VIP name: scan3, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.83

Now tell CRS to update the SCAN VIP resources:

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl modify scan -n sales-scan.example.com

To verify that the change was successful, check the SCAN configuration again:

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl config scan

SCAN name: sales-scan, Network: 1/10.100.10.0/255.255.255.0/eth1 SCAN VIP name: scan1, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.121 SCAN VIP name: scan2, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.122 SCAN VIP name: scan3, IP: /sales-scan.example.com/10.100.10.123

Start SCAN and the SCAN listener:

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl start scan

# $GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl start scan_listener

Please note that if the SCAN VIPs are being changed because of a change of the subnet of

the public network additional changes may be required , e.g. the node VIPs and the network resource (ora.net1.network). For more information please refer to Document

276434.1 and the 11.2 documentation. My Oracle Support

Question No: 73

Examine the following details from the AWR report for your three-instance RAC database:

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Which inferences is correct?

  1. There are a large number of requests for cr blocks or current blocks currently in progress.

  2. Global cache access is optimal without any significant delays.

  3. The log file sync waits are clue to cluster interconnect latency.

  4. To determine the frequency of two-way block requests you must examine other events In the report.

Answer: B Explanation:

Analyzing Cache Fusion Transfer Impact Using GCS Statistics

This section describes how to monitor GCS performance by identifying objects read and modified frequently and the service times imposed by the remote access. Waiting for blocks to arrive may constitute a significant portion of the response time, in the same way that reading from disk could increase the block access delays, only that cache fusion transfers in most cases are faster than disk access latencies.

The following wait events indicate that the remotely cached blocks were shipped to the

local instance without having been busy, pinned or requiring a log flush:

gc current block 2-way gc current block 3-way gc cr block 2-way

gc cr block 3-way

The object statistics for gc current blocks received and gc cr blocks received enable quick identification of the indexes and tables which are shared by the active instances. As mentioned earlier, creating an ADDM analysis will, in most cases, point you to the SQL statements and database objects that could be impacted by interinstance contention.

Any increases in the average wait times for the events mentioned in the preceding list could be caused by the following occurrences:

High load: CPU shortages, long run queues, scheduling delays

Misconfiguration: using public instead of private interconnect for message and block traffic If the average wait times are acceptable and no interconnect or load issues can be diagnosed, then the accumulated time waited can usually be attributed to a few SQL statements which need to be tuned to minimize the number of blocks accessed.

Oracle庐 Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Question No: 74

What does a high “gc current block busy” event value indicate?

  1. Access to cached data blocks was delayed because they were busy either in the remote or the local cache.

  2. A large number of requested blocks were not cached In any instance.

  3. Asynchronous input/output (I/O) is disabled.

  4. Delay in processing has occurred In the GCS, caused by CPU saturation and would have to be solved by additional CPUs and load-balancing.

Answer: A

Explanation: The gc current block busy wait event indicates that the access to cached data blocks was delayed because they were busy either in the remote or the local cache. This could be caused by any of the following:

->The blocks were pinned

->The blocks were held up by sessions

->The blocks were delayed by a log write on a remote instance

->A session on the same instance was already accessing a block which was in transition between instances and the current session needed to wait behind it (for example, gc current block busy)

Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide

Question No: 75

You have two administrator-defined server pools on your eight-node cluster called OLTP and DSS.

Hosts RACNODE3, RACNODE4, and RACNODE5 are currently assigned to the DSS Pool. Hosts RACNODE6, RACNODE7, and RACNODE8 are assigned to the OLTP Pool.

Hosts RACNODE1 and RACNODE2 are assigned to the Generic pool.

You are patching the Oracle Grid Infrastructure in a rolling fashion for your cluster and you have completed patching nodes RACNODE3, RACNODE4, RACNODE5, and RACNODE6, but you have not patched nodes RACNODE1 and RACNODE2.

While examining the status of RACNODE2 software, you get this output:

$ crsctl query crs softwareversion

Oracle Cluster-ware version on node [RACNODE2] is [11.2.0.2.0]

$ crsctl query crs activeversion

Oracle Clusterware active version on node [RACNODE2] is [11.2.0.1.0]

Which two statements describe the reasons for the active versions on the nodes of the cluster?

  1. The active version is 11.2.0.2.0 on RACNODE3, RACNODE4, and RACNODE5 because all the nodes in the DSS server pool have the same installed version.

  2. The active version is 11.2.0.1.0 on RACNODE6, RACNODE7, and RACNODE8 because some nodes in the cluster still have version 11.2.0.1.0 installed.

  3. The active version is 11.2.0.1.0 on RACNODE6, RACNODE7, and RACNODE8 because some nodes in the OLTP Pool still have version 11.2.0.1.0 installed.

  4. The active version is 11.2.0.1.0 on RACNODE3, RACNODE4, and RACNODE5

because some nodes in the cluster still have version 11.2.0.1.0 installed.

Answer: B,D Explanation:

crsctl query crs softwareversion

Use the crsctl query crs softwareversion command to display latest version of the software that has been successfully started on the specified node.

crsctl query crs activeversion

Use the crsctl query crs activeversion command to display the active version of the Oracle Clusterware software running in the cluster. During a rolling upgrade, however, the active version is not advanced until the upgrade is finished across the cluster, until which time the cluster operates at the pre-upgrade version.

Oracle庐 Clusterware Administration and Deployment Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Question No: 76

Which are the key factors that you should consider before converting a single-Instance database Oracle Real Application Cluster (RAC) database to guarantee a successful media recovery?

  1. If the database is in archive log mode, the archive file format requires a thread number.

  2. The archive logs from all nodes must be accessible to all nodes in the cluster database.

  3. The storage option must be Automatic Storage Management (ASM).

  4. All database files must be migrated to Oracle Managed Files (OMF).

Answer: A,B Explanation:

Issues for Converting Single Instance Databases to Oracle RAC Backup procedures should be available before conversion takes place.

Archiving in Oracle RAC environments requires a thread number in the archive file format. The archived logs from all instances of an Oracle RAC database are required for media recovery.

By default, all database files are migrated to Oracle Managed Files (OMF).

D60488GC11

Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 11 – 24

Question No: 77

You notice that there is a very high percentage of wait time for the ‘enq:HW-contention’ event in your RAC database that has frequent insert operations.

Which two recommendations may reduce this problem?

  1. shorter transactions

  2. increasing sequence cache sizes

  3. using reverse key indexes

  4. uniform and large extent sizes

  5. automatic segment space management

  6. smaller extent sizes

Answer: D,E

Explanation: Segments have High Water Mark (HWM) indicating that blocks below that HWM have been formatted. New tables or truncated tables [that is truncated without reuse storage clause], have HWM value set to segment header block. Meaning, there are zero blocks below HWM. As new rows inserted or existing rows updated (increasing row length), more blocks are added to the free lists and HWM bumped up to reflect these new blocks.

HW enqueues are acquired in Exclusive mode before updating HWM and essentially HW enqueues operate as a serializing mechanism for HWM updates. Allocating additional extent with instance keyword seems to help in non-ASSM tablespace

Serialization of data blocks in the buffer cache due to lack of free lists, free list groups, transaction slots (INITRANS), or shortage of rollback segments.

This is particularly common on INSERT-heavy applications, in applications that have raised the block size above 8K, or in applications with large numbers of active users and few rollback segments. Use automatic segment-space management (ASSM) and automatic undo management to solve this problem.

HW enqueue The HW enqueue is used to serialize the allocation of space beyond the high water mark of a segment.

->V$SESSION_WAIT.P2 / V$LOCK.ID1 is the tablespace number.

->V$SESSION_WAIT.P3 / V$LOCK.ID2 is the relative dba of segment header of the object for which space is being allocated.

If this is a point of contention for an object, then manual allocation of extents solves the problem.

Question No: 78

Which statement describes the requirements for the network interface names, such as eth0, in Oracle Clusterware?

  1. Only the public interface names must be the same for all nodes.

  2. Only the private interface names must be the same for all nodes.

  3. Both the public interface name and the private interface name must be the same for all nodes.

  4. Both the public interface name and the private interface name can vary on different nodes.

  5. Only the private interface names can be different on different nodes.

  6. Only the public interface names can be different on different nodes.

Answer: C Explanation:

Checking Network Requirements

Each node must have at least two network interface cards (NICs). Interface names must be the same on all nodes.

Public NIC must support TCP/IP and Private NIC UDP.

Public IP must be registered in the domain name server (DNS) or the /etc/hosts file.

# cat /etc/hosts

##### Public Interfaces – eth0 (odd numbers)#### xxx.xxx.100.11

host01.example.com host01 xxx.xxx.100.13 host02.example.com host02

IF GNS is used, the Cluster GNS address must be registered in the DNS.

Prevent public network failures when using NAS devices or NFS mounts by starting the Name Service Cache Daemon.

# /sbin/service nscd start

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Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 2 – 18

Question No: 79

On the OUI Grid Plug and Play information page, you can configure GRID Naming Service (GNS). What will be the SCAN Name field default to if you enter cluster01 in the cluster Name field and cluster01.example.com in the GNS Sub Domain field?

  1. cluster01.example.com

  2. cluster01-qns.example.com

  3. cluster01-scan.cluster01.example.com

  4. cluster-vip.example.com

Answer: C

Explanation: If you specify a GNS domain, then the SCAN name defaults to clustername– scan.GNS_domain. Otherwise, it defaults to clustername-scan.current_domain. For example, if you start Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation from the server node1, the cluster name is mycluster, and the GNS domain is grid.example.com, then the SCAN Name is mycluster-scan.grid.example.com.

Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide

Question No: 80

The System Global Area (SGA) for the ASM instance contains distinct memory areas. Choose three areas that are contained within the ASM SGA.

  1. Shared Pool

  2. Buffer Cache

  3. Log Buffer

  4. Large Pool

  5. ASM Cache

  6. Streams Pool

Answer: A,D,E Explanation: Section: (none)

The SGA in an ASM instance is different in memory allocation and usage than the SGA in a database instance. The SGA in the ASM instance is divided into four primary areas as follows:

Shared Pool: Used for metadata information

Large Pool: Used for parallel operations

ASM Cache: Used for reading and writing blocks during rebalance operations Free Memory: Unallocated memory available

D60488GC11

Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration

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