[Free] 2018(Jan) Latesttests Testking Oracle 1z0-053 Dumps with VCE and PDF Download 281-290

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Oracle Database 11g: Administration II

Question No: 281 – (Topic 7)

What is the purpose of the until change option of the restore command?

  1. It allows you to select the SCN that you want to restore to.

  2. It allows you to select the log sequence number you want to restore to.

  3. It allows you to select the timestamp you want to restore to.

  4. It allows you to manually stop the restore at any time as online redo logs are applied.

  5. None of the above.

Answer: A Explanation:

The keyword of CHANGE means to point to the system change number (SCN).

Question No: 282 – (Topic 7)

Your database is running in ARCHIVELOG mode. You have been taking backups of all the data files and control files regularly.

You are informed that some important tables in the BILLING tablespace have been dropped on February 28, 2007 at 10.30 AM and must be recovered.

You decide to perform an incomplete recovery using the following command: SQLgt; RECOVER DATABASE UNTIL TIME #39;2007-02-28:10:15:00#39;;

Identify the files that must be restored to recover the missing tables successfully.

  1. Restore the backup of all the data files.

  2. Restore the backup of all the data files and the control file.

  3. Restore the backup of only the data files that contain the dropped tables.

  4. Restore the backup of all the data files belonging to the tablespace containing the dropped tables.

Answer: A Explanation:

The tricky of answer is the command quot;RECOVER DATABASEquot;, so that you must use quot;RESTORE DATABASEquot; to restore all the data files.

If the recover command is quot;RECOVER DATAFILEquot;, then the Answer D will be correct.

Question No: 283 – (Topic 7)

While performing the backup of the flash recovery area, you notice that one of the archived redo log files is missing. You have multiple destinations for archived redo log files. What implications does it have on the backup of the flash recovery area?

  1. The backup fails because one of the archived redo log files is missing.

  2. The backup succeeds but it would be without the missing archived log.

  3. During backup, you are prompted for the alternative destination for the missing archived redo log file.

  4. The backup succeeds because it fails over to one of the alternative archived redo log destinations.

Answer: D

Question No: 284 – (Topic 7)

In Recovery Manager (RMAN), you are taking image copies of the datafiles of your production database and rolling them forward as regular intervals. You attempt to restart your database instance after a regular maintenance task, you realize that one of the data files that belongs to the USERS tablespace is damaged and you need to recover the datafile by using the image copy. You could perform the following steps to accomplish this:

  1. Mount the database

  2. Take the data file offline

  3. Bring the data file online

  4. Use the RMAN SWITCH TO command to switch the image copy

  5. Apply the archived redo logs

  6. Open the database

  7. Use the RMAN RESTORE TO command to switch to the image copy

Which two options illustrate the correct sequence of steps that you could follow? (Choose two.)

A. 2, 6, 4, 5, 3

B. 1, 2, 4, 5, 3, 6

C. 1, 2, 4, 6, 3

D. 1, 2, 7, 5, 3, 6

Answer: B,D

Question No: 285 – (Topic 7)

Which command will restore all datafiles to the date 9/30/2008 at 18:00 hours?

  1. restore datafiles until time #39;09/28/2008:21:03:11#39;;

  2. restore database files until time #39;09/28/2008:18:00:00#39;;

  3. restore database until time #39;09/28/2008:18:00:00#39;;

  4. recover database until time #39;09/28/2008:18:00:00#39;;

  5. recover database until timestamp #39;09/28/2008:18:00:00#39;;

    Answer: C

    Question No: 286 – (Topic 7)

    You are using Recovery Manager (RMAN) with a recovery catalog to back up your production database. The backups and the archived redo log files are copied to a tape drive on a daily basis. Because of media failure, you lost your production database completely along with the recovery catalog database. You want to recover the target database and make it functional. You consider performing the following steps to accomplish the task:

    1. Restore an autobackup of the server parameter file.

    2. Restore the control file

    3. Start the target database instance

    4. Mount the database

    5. Restore the data files

    6. Open the database with RESETLOGS option

    7. Recover the data files

    8. Set DBID for the target database

Which option illustrates the correct sequence that you must use?

A. 8, 1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6

B. 1, 8, 3, 4, 2, 5, 7, 6

C. 1, 3, 4, 2, 8, 5, 6, 7

D. 1, 3, 2, 4, 6, 5, 7, 8

Answer: A Explanation:

Recovering the Database After a Disaster

The procedure for disaster recovery is similar to the procedure for recovering the database with a backup control file in NOCATALOG mode. If you are restoring the database to a new host, then you should also review the considerations described in quot;Restoring a Database on a New Hostquot;.

This scenario assumes that the Linux server on which your database was running has been damaged beyond repair. Fortunately, you backed up the database to Oracle Secure Backup and have the tapes available. The scenario assumes the following:

->Oracle Database is already installed on the new host.

->You are restoring the database to a new Linux host with the same directory structure as the old host.

->You have one tape drive containing backups of all the data files and archived redo logs through log 1124, and autobackups of the control file and server parameter file.

->You do not use a recovery catalog with the database.

To recover the database on the new host:

  1. If possible, restore or re-create all relevant network files such as tnsnames.ora and listener.ora and a password file.

  2. Start RMAN and connect to the target database instance.

    At this stage, no initialization parameter file exists. If you have set ORACLE_SID and ORACLE_HOME, then you can use operating system authentication to connect as SYSDBA. For example, start RMAN as follows:

    % rman

    RMANgt; CONNECT TARGET

    /

  3. Specify the DBID for the target database with the SET DBID command, as described in quot;Restoring the Server Parameter Filequot;.

    For example, enter the following command: SET DBID 676549873;

  4. Run the STARTUP NOMOUNT command.

    When the server parameter file is not available, RMAN attempts to start the instance with a dummy server parameter file.

  5. Allocate a channel to the media manager and then restore the server parameter file from autobackup.

    For example, enter the following command to restore the server parameter file from Oracle Secure Backup:

    RUN

    {

    ALLOCATE CHANNEL c1 DEVICE TYPE sbt; RESTORE SPFILE FROM AUTOBACKUP;

    }

  6. Restart the instance with the restored server parameter file. STARTUP FORCE NOMOUNT;

  7. Write a command file to perform the restore and recovery operation, and then execute the command file.

    The command file should do the following:

    1. Allocate a channel to the media manager.

    2. Restore a control file autobackup (see quot;Performing Recovery with a Backup Control File and No Recovery Catalogquot;).

    3. Mount the restored control file.

    4. Catalog any backups not recorded in the repository with the CATALOG command.

    5. Restore the data files to their original locations. If volume names have changed, then run SET

      NEWNAME commands before the restore operation and perform a switch after the restore operation to update the control file with the new locations for the data files, as shown in the following example.

    6. Recover the data files. RMAN stops recovery when it reaches the log sequence number specified.

      RMANgt; RUN

      {

      # Manually allocate a channel to the media manager ALLOCATE CHANNEL t1 DEVICE TYPE sbt;

      # Restore autobackup of the control file. This example assumes that you have

      # accepted the default format for the autobackup name. RESTORE CONTROLFILE FROM AUTOBACKUP;

      # The set until command is used in case the database

      # structure has changed in the most recent backups, and you want to

      # recover to that point in time. In this way RMAN restores the database

      # to the same structure that the database had at the specified time. ALTER DATABASE MOUNT;

      SET UNTIL SEQUENCE 1124 THREAD 1; RESTORE DATABASE;

      RECOVER DATABASE;

      }

      The following example of the RUN command shows the same scenario except with new file names for the restored data files:

      RMANgt; RUN

      {

      # If you must restore the files to new locations,

      # use SET NEWNAME commands:

      SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 1 TO #39;/dev/vgd_1_0/rlvt5_500M_1#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 2 TO #39;/dev/vgd_1_0/rlvt5_500M_2#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 3 TO #39;/dev/vgd_1_0/rlvt5_500M_3#39;; ALLOCATE CHANNEL t1 DEVICE TYPE sbt;

      RESTORE CONTROLFILE FROM AUTOBACKUP; ALTER DATABASE MOUNT;

      SET UNTIL SEQUENCE 124 THREAD 1; RESTORE DATABASE;

      SWITCH DATAFILE ALL; # Update control file with new location of data files. RECOVER DATABASE;

      }

  8. If recovery was successful, then open the database and reset the online logs: ALTER DATABASE OPEN RESETLOGS;

Question No: 287 – (Topic 7)

When running the tablespace point-in-time command

recover tablespace users

until time #39;10/06/2008:22:42:00#39; auxiliary destination #39;c:\oracle\auxiliary#39;;

You receive the following error:

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What is the likely cause of the error?

  1. The database is in ARCHIVELOG mode.

  2. There is not a current backup of the database available.

  3. The USERS tablespace has dependent objects in other tablespaces and can not be a part of a TSPITR alone.

  4. The USERS tablespace is not eligible for TSPITR because it has invalid objects.

  5. The recover tablespace command is incorrect and generates the error.

    Answer: B

    Question No: 288 – (Topic 7)

    When performing a full database disaster recovery with RMAN, in what order would you execute these steps?

    1. Restore the control file from autobackups.

    2. Run the RMAN restore and recover command.

    3. Restore the database spfile from autobackups.

    4. Make the RMAN backup set pieces available.

    5. Open the database with the alter database open resetlogs command.

    6. Open the database with the alter database open command.

  1. a, b, c, d, e, f

  2. c, d, a, b, f

  3. d, c, a, b, f

  4. d, b, d, c, e

  5. d, c, a, b, e

Answer: E

Question No: 289 – (Topic 7)

Your production database is functional on the SHOST1 host. You are backing up the production database by using Recovery Manager (RMAN) with the recovery catalog. You want to replicate the production database to anther host, SHOST2, for testing new applications.

After you ensured that the backups of the target database are accessible on the new host, what must you do to restore and recover the backup for the test environment?

  1. Restoring the control file from the backup by using the NOCATALOG option to restore, and recovering the data files

  2. Restoring the data files by using the NOCATALOG option and using the SET NEWNAME command to change the location

  3. Restoring the server parameter file from the backup by using the recovery catalog to restore,

  4. Restoring the data files from the backup by using the recovery catalog to recover the files, and using the SWITCH command to change the location.

    Answer: A Explanation: Refer to here:

    To restore the database on a new host:

    1. Ensure that the backups of the target database are accessible on the new host.

    2. Configure the ORACLE_SID on hostb.

    3. Start RMAN on hostb and connect to the target database without connecting to the recovery catalog.

      For example, enter the following command:

      % rman NOCATALOG RMANgt; CONNECT TARGET

      /

    4. Set the DBID and start the database instance without mounting the database. For example, run SET DBID to set the DBID, then run STARTUP NOMOUNT: SET DBID 1340752057;

      STARTUP NOMOUNT

      RMAN fails to find the server parameter file, which has not yet been restored, but starts the instance with a quot;dummyquot; file. Sample output follows:

      startup failed: ORA-01078: failure in processing system parameters

      LRM-00109: could not open parameter file #39;/net/hostb/oracle/dbs/inittrgta.ora#39; trying to start the Oracle instance without parameter files …

      Oracle instance started

    5. Restore and edit the server parameter file.

      Allocate a channel to the media manager, then restore the server parameter file as a client- side parameter file and use the SET command to indicate the location of the autobackup (in this example, the autobackup is in /tmp):

      RUN

      {

      ALLOCATE CHANNEL c1 DEVICE TYPE sbt PARMS #39;…#39;;

      SET CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK TO #39;/tmp/%F#39;; RESTORE SPFILE

      TO PFILE #39;?/oradata/test/inittrgta.ora#39; FROM AUTOBACKUP; SHUTDOWN ABORT;

      }

    6. Edit the restored initialization parameter file.

      Change any location-specific parameters, for example, those ending in _DEST, to reflect the new directory structure. For example, edit the following parameters:

      • IFILE

      • LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_1

      • CONTROL_FILES

    7. Restart the instance with the edited initialization parameter file. For example, enter the following command:

      STARTUP FORCE NOMOUNT PFILE=#39;?/oradata/test/inittrgta.ora#39;;

    8. Restore the control file from an autobackup and then mount the database. For example, enter the following command:

      RUN

      {

      ALLOCATE CHANNEL c1 DEVICE TYPE sbt PARMS #39;…#39;; RESTORE CONTROLFILE FROM AUTOBACKUP; ALTER DATABASE MOUNT;

      }

      RMAN restores the control file to whatever locations you specified in the CONTROL_FILES initialization parameter.

    9. Catalog the data file copies that you copied in quot;Restoring Disk Backups to a New Hostquot;, using their new file names or CATALOG START WITH (if you know all the files are in directories with a common prefix easily addressed with a CATALOG START WITH command). For example, run:

      CATALOG START WITH #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/#39;;

      If you want to specify files individually, then you can execute a CATALOG command as follows:

      CATALOG DATAFILECOPY

      #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/system01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/undotbs01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/cwmlite01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/drsys01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/example01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/indx01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/tools01.dbf#39;, #39;/oracle/oradata/trgt/users01.dbf#39;;

    10. Start a SQL*Plus session on the new database and query the database file names recorded in the control file.

      Because the control file is from the trgta database, the recorded file names use the original hosta file names. You can query V$ views to obtain this information. Run the following query in SQL*Plus:

      COLUMN NAME FORMAT a60

      SPOOL LOG #39;/tmp/db_filenames.out#39; SELECT FILE# AS quot;File/Grp#quot;, NAME FROM V$DATAFILE

      UNION

      SELECT GROUP#,MEMBER FROM V$LOGFILE;

      SPOOL OFF EXIT

    11. Write the RMAN restore and recovery script. The script must include the following steps:

      1. For each data file on the destination host that is restored to a different path than it had on the source host, use a SET NEWNAME command to specify the new path on the destination host. If the file systems on the destination system are set up to have the same paths as the source host, then do not use SET NEWNAME for those files restored to the same path as on the source host.

      2. For each online redo log that is to be created at a different location than it had on the source host, use SQL ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE commands to specify the path name on the destination host. If the file systems on the destination system are set up to have the same paths as the source host, then do not use ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE for those files restored to the same path as on the source host.

      3. Perform a SET UNTIL operation to limit recovery to the end of the archived redo logs. The recovery stops with an error if no SET UNTIL command is specified.

      4. Restore and recover the database.

      5. Run the SWITCH DATAFILE ALL command so that the control file recognizes the new path names as the official new names of the data files.

      Example 20-3 shows the RMAN script reco_test.rman that can perform the restore and recovery operation.

      Example 20-3 Restoring a Database on a New Host:

      RUN

      {

      # allocate a channel to the tape device

      ALLOCATE CHANNEL c1 DEVICE TYPE sbt PARMS #39;…#39;;

      # rename the data files and online redo logs

      SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 1 TO #39;?/oradata/test/system01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 2 TO #39;?/oradata/test/undotbs01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 3 TO #39;?/oradata/test/cwmlite01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 4 TO #39;?/oradata/test/drsys01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 5 TO #39;?/oradata/test/example01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 6 TO #39;?/oradata/test/indx01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 7 TO #39;?/oradata/test/tools01.dbf#39;; SET NEWNAME FOR DATAFILE 8 TO #39;?/oradata/test/users01.dbf#39;;

      SQL quot;ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE #39;#39;/dev3/oracle/dbs/redo01.log#39;#39; TO #39;#39;?/oradata/test/redo01.log#39;#39; quot;;

      SQL quot;ALTER DATABASE RENAME FILE #39;#39;/dev3/oracle/dbs/redo02.log#39;#39; TO #39;#39;?/oradata/test/redo02.log#39;#39; quot;;

      # Do a SET UNTIL to prevent recovery of the online logs SET UNTIL SCN 123456;

      # restore the database and switch the data file names RESTORE DATABASE;

      SWITCH DATAFILE ALL;

      # recover the database RECOVER DATABASE;

      } EXIT

    12. Execute the script created in the previous step.

      For example, start RMAN to connect to the target database and run the @ command:

      % rman TARGET / NOCATALOG

      RMANgt; @reco_test.rman

    13. Open the restored database with the RESETLOGS option.

      From the RMAN prompt, open the database with the RESETLOGS option:

      ALTER DATABASE OPEN RESETLOGS;

      Caution:

      When you re-open your database in the next step, do not connect to the recovery catalog. Otherwise, the new database incarnation created is registered automatically in the recovery catalog, and the file names of the production database are replaced by the new file names specified in the script.

    14. Optionally, delete the test database with all of its files. Note:

If you used an ASM disk group, then the DROP DATABASE command is the only way to safely remove the files of the test database. If you restored to non-ASM storage then you can also use operating system commands to remove the database.

Use the DROP DATABASE command to delete all files associated with the database automatically. The following example deletes the database files:

STARTUP FORCE NOMOUNT PFILE=#39;?/oradata/test/inittrgta.ora#39;; DROP DATABASE;

Because you did not perform the restore and recovery operation when connected to the recovery catalog, the recovery catalog contains no records for any of the restored files or the procedures performed during the test. Likewise, the control file of the trgta database is completely unaffected by the test.

Question No: 290 – (Topic 7)

Which commands are used for RMAN database recovery? (Choose all that apply.)

  1. restore

  2. repair

  3. copy

  4. recover

  5. replace

Answer: A,D

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